The Place I Left My Heart: The Gila Wilderness

I fell instantly in love with the Gila Wilderness, the first designated Wilderness Area in the US on my very first hike. And every day of the weeks we spent here, I fell harder and more completely in love with this place.

It is a wild beauty, the Gila.

Sitting in the woods watching a pair of red-naped sapsuckers tapping away on a juniper tree, catching glimpses of elk and mule deer and black bear (and the occasional errant cow) is all I need for heart filled with happiness. Leaned against an alligator juniper with a mug full of wine listening to nuthatches and wrens or delighting in the crunching noise of fallen leaves beneath my feet makes me smile. Canyon wrens and white-breasted nuthatches sing from the pines, Javalinas roam the hillsides, coyotes yip by moonlight. Knowing that the Mexican wolf roams these woods fills my soul with awe.

This is the stuff of dreams for this girl.

On our final day in the Gila Wilderness, John was feeling unwell and so I set off on a 18-kilometre hike along an undulating mountain ridge.

To John’s surprise I returned to camp many hours early. He asked why.

“Because I was nearly gored by a javalina boar.”

John’s response to this news? “Did you get a picture?”

“No John,” I say incredulously. “I was busy deciding whether to climb the flimsy juniper tree I was hiding behind or jump five feet down a cliff into a canyon.”

My final day of hiking in the Gila Wilderness will forever by my most memorable day in New Mexico. I don’t think anyone forgets the day they were nearly gored by a javalina boar.

Any place where I am made small and insignificant, amid a great big grand and wild world, where wild things like tarantulas, javalinas and endangered Mexican wolves roam, where people come second is where I yearn to be.

“Like winds and sunsets, wild things were taken for granted until progress began to do away with them. Now, we face the question whether a still higher ‘standard of living’ is worth its cost in things natural, wild and free.” Aldo Leopold

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